Tagged: Economic and Social Inclusion to Prevent Violent Extremism

Economic and Social Inclusion to Prevent Violent Extremism – World Bank Report

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The World Bank MENA Economic Monitor  from the Chief Economist’s Office of the Middle East and North African Region report,  “Economic and Social Inclusion to Prevent Violent Extremism” (pdf).

The report  splits up by region and in one aspect, points out what has become apparent that the Daesh and Foreign Fighters come from a educated and wealthy sector of a society. This was particularly of note with the Dhaka attack where five young man from stable and well supported and financially stable backgrounds perpetrated a terror attack. It is also noticeable from the ‘teen terror arrests’ that these radicalised young men come from comfortable backgrounds. (Operation Rising)

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foreign recruits from the Middle East, North Africa and South and East Asia are significantly more educated than what is typical in their region

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Two slides of interest shown below show the ‘average age’ of Daesh and Foreign Fighters and the ‘Schooling attained”. The report makes shows how macroeconomics and oil prices in the different regions have crashed in commodity prices, pushing economies into deep recession.

The Syrian war has ravaged the economy, output has shrunk between 50 to 60 percent, the Syrian Pound has lost 80 percent of value, the population has fallen by 23 percent, 12.4 million are displaced internally (7.6 million) and externally (4.8 million) since the start of the conflict, and education is on hold for many of the children living inside and outside of the country.”

The 18-month civil war in Yemen has resulted in 10,000 civilians killed, 2.8 million people displaced and most Yemenis suffering from shortages of food, water, sanitation and healthcare

Egypt below

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The outlook for each of the regions is projected.

as projected oil prices trend upwards and production rises, growth is expected to pick up in the medium term. Tight fiscal policy will hold back government expenditure growth while simultane- ously developing new revenue sources, thereby reversing the fiscal deficit

Further Reading  

Combating Terrorism Center

“A PREDICTABLE FAILURE: THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF THE DECLINE OF THE ISLAMIC STATE” (pdf)

Perspectives on Terrorism

Understanding the Daesh Economy (pdf)